Tracy family say expanding child tax credit will help lift them out of poverty

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Melinda Ramirez, her husband and four children – all under the age of 17 – have experienced fires, homelessness and uncertainty. After the fire, we had to live on all of our credit cards and were in deep debt. We had a lot of credit card debt and high interest rates, we were never going to get out of it, ever, ”Ramirez said. But through it all, she also had help. “It will change everything. It will change our whole life,” she said. After losing their home to a fire about five years ago and a nine-year wait, the family moved into social housing and Ramirez found a new job. . “Being homeless back then is what led to my job where I work now, working with the homeless,” Ramirez said. Then the pandemic struck. “I had a lot of work to do during the pandemic, but my husband didn’t. He does landscaping,” she said. Ramirez says the stimulus payments helped. “We never would have it. been able to get out of that credit card debt, except the stimulus checks, it saved us, “she said. They will receive $ 12,000 a year, starting next week,” said Rep. Josh Harder, a Democrat who represents southern San Joaquin County and Stanislaus County. Harder said the biggest child tax credit of all time will reach 54,600 households, 196,300 children in the central valley starting July 15. The average family will benefit an average of $ 5,000 next year. ”This child tax credit aims to level the playing field and ensure that no matter where you are born, you have the same access to opportunities, ”said Harder. Ramirez says with the extra money comes a potentially better future. “It’s going to put us just in that bracket where we can afford to live somewhere outside of government housing. It means we’re going to have a house,” she said. The expanded child tax credit is only a one-year increase. Congressman Harder said he was working on a bipartisan effort to extend credit and make it permanent. For families in Stanislaus and southern San Joaquin counties who may need help from the Harder’s representative office, you can contact him at Harder.house.gov, or by phone at 209-579-5458. The IRS Non-Reporting Tool can be found here.

Melinda Ramirez, her husband and four children – all under the age of 17 – have experienced fires, homelessness and uncertainty.

“After the fire, we had to live on all of our credit cards and we had a lot of credit card debt. We had a lot of credit card debt and high interest rates, we were never going to. get out of it, never, ”Ramirez said.

But through it all, she also had help.

“It will change everything. It will change our whole life,” she said.

After losing their home to a fire about five years ago and a nine-year wait, the family moved into social housing and Ramirez found a new job.

“Being homeless back then is what drove my job as I work now, working with the homeless,” Ramirez said.

Then the pandemic struck.

“I had a lot of work to do during the pandemic, but my husband didn’t. He does landscaping,” she said.

Ramirez says the stimulus payments have helped.

“We would never have gotten out of this credit card debt except the stimulus checks, it saved us,” she said.

Even more help is on the way.

“They’re going to be getting $ 12,000 a year, starting next week,” said Rep. Josh Harder, a Democrat who represents southern San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties.

Harder says the biggest child tax credit of all time will reach 54,600 households, 196,300 children in the Central Valley starting July 15. The average family will benefit an average of $ 5,000 next year.

“This child tax credit is about leveling the playing field and ensuring that no matter where you were born you have equal access to opportunities,” said Harder.

Ramirez says that with the extra money comes a potentially better future.

“It’s going to put us just in that bracket where we can afford to live somewhere outside of government housing. It means we’re going to have a house,” she said.

The expanded child tax credit is only a one-year increase. Congressman Harder said he was working on a bipartisan effort to extend credit and make it permanent.

For families in Stanislaus and southern San Joaquin counties who may need assistance from the Harder’s representative office, you can contact him at Harder.house.gov or by phone at 209-579-5458.

The IRS Non-Filer Tool can be found here.


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